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Archive for October, 2017

The only Indian family where all members are pilot


This family had held on to a profession as a reign for over 100 years now! Flying has been dominating this Delhi family and what the parents started off as their passion, career and a goal to achieve, their kids all follow them. These parents are so inspiring and their only advice for their kids are not to be tempted to land when the weather is bad, to carry extra fuel, and to never be in a hurry!

Captain Jai Dev Bhasin was the pioneer in the family to become one among the 7 commanders in India 1954. His son, Captain Rohit Bhasin and his daughter-in-law Niveditha Jain, carried the tradition of flying in the family!

Credits: Hindustantimes.

Niveditha was just 20 when she received her first appointment letter from Indian Airlines on June 24, 1984. Interestingly, Rohit and Niveditha’s children are keeping up with the traditions and today they…

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Are You Born to Win?


Whenever I hear someone described as a born winner I always wonder what the person described as ?the born winner? thinks. They very well may have been born with some advantages, a ?leg up? if you will. Wealthy parents, a good environment, good role models in their life are some that come to mind but I believe this much is certain; they were not born winners. They worked, probably very hard, to become a winner. Even people born with advantages can ?lazy? the advantages away if they refuse to work to maximize them.

People who win have invariably formed the habits of doing the things that people who don?t win simply don?t like to do. Winners don?t necessary like to do them either but they do them anyway. They do them to win!

Winners make better choices; sometimes the choices are hard to make but they make them anyway. People…

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What’s Killing Us: Study Finds Pollution Deadlier Than War, Disaster, Hunger

Our Better Health

Pollution was responsible for nine million deaths around the world in 2015, and although many were in industrializing countries, Canada has not been immune to the harm, a newly released study says.

It’s a toll that’s three times higher than deaths from AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined and 15 times higher than from wars and other violence, according to the Lancet Commission on Pollution and Health, whose findings were released on Thursday in the medical journal The Lancet.

The commission is a pollution research effort uniting Lancet, the Global Alliance on Health and Pollution and the Icahn School of Medicine in New York.

Tensions rising as Chinese no longer willing to hold their breath on pollution problems

The deaths from illnesses and diseases linked to the pollutants are considered premature, the report says, because they would otherwise not have occurred without exposure to the various forms of pollution.

“Nearly 92…

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Relationship Between Sugar And Cancer Is Now Clearer, Scientists Say

Our Better Health

Belgian scientists say they’ve made a research breakthrough in the relationship between sugar and cancer.

Researchers found yeast with high levels of the sugar known as glucose overstimulated the same proteins often found mutated inside human tumors, making cells grow faster. The finding, published in Nature Communications on Friday, aims to shed light on how cancer develops.

Johan Thevelein, Wim Versées and Veerle Janssens started researching sugar’s link to cancer in 2008 to try and better understand what’s called the Warburg effect, when tumor cells make energy through a rapid breakdown of glucose not seen in normal cells. That energy fuels tumor growth.

The research “is able to explain the correlation between the strength of the Warburg effect and tumor aggressiveness,” Thevelein, from KU Leuven in Belgium, said in a release. “This link between sugar and cancer has sweeping consequences. Our results provide a foundation for future research in this…

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Kids Are Spending More Time On Mobile Devices Than Ever Before

Our Better Health

Almost half of young children now have their own tablet, a new report says.

According to the report, which comes from Common Sense Media, those tablets are seeing plenty of use. Kids younger than eight are reportedly spending an average of two hours and 19 minutes per day glued to screens. Roughly 30 percent of that time is spent on mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones. Forty-two percent of youngsters have a personal tablet.

While screen use has held fairly steady over time—kids in 2011 spent two hours and 16 minutes per day looking at screens, for example—the medium of choice has changed dramatically, according to the Common Sense Census. Television is still the most popular screen, but daily time spent watching the tube has dropped by 11 minutes since 2011. During the same time period, meanwhile, mobile device use has exploded from five minutes per day to its…

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This Is Why You Shouldn’t Offer Your Seat To The Elderly, Claim Health Experts

Our Better Health

Just stay put.

Standup citizens know that if you see a senior board the bus or train, you immediately get up and offer them your seat.

But according to health experts, we shouldn’t be giving up our seat for the elderly on public transportation — rather, we should just stay put.

Yeah, we’re a bit wary about this advice too, but hear us out.

As reported by The Independent, experts claim that offering your seat to seniors on public transport can hamper their health. Instead, they should be “encouraged to stand and discouraged from taking it easy in order to keep themselves fit,” advises Sir Muir Gray, a professor at Oxford.

Think twice before giving up your seat on the bus or train to an older person. Standing up is great exercise for them.

Gray, a clinical adviser to Public Health England, recently explained that the elderly should walk for…

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Hang Out With Happy People — It Might Be Contagious

Our Better Health

You can actually catch a good mood or a bad mood from your friends, according to a recent study in the journal Royal Society Open Science. But that shouldn’t stop you from hanging out with pals who are down in the dumps, say the study authors: Thankfully, the effect isn’t large enough to push you into depression.

The new study adds to a growing body of research suggesting that happiness and sadness—as well as lifestyle and behavioral factors like smoking, drinking, obesity, fitness habits and even the ability to concentrate—can spread across social networks, both online and in real life. But while many previous studies have only looked at friendship data at one point in time, this is one of the few that measured social and mood changes over time.

This method was able to show how friends actually influenced each other, and helped rule out the possibility that similarities…

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