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Archive for January, 2018

Rely on the meaning, not just on the words

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“Rely on the message of the teacher, not on his personality;
Rely on the meaning, not just on the words;
Rely on the real meaning, not on the provisional one;
Rely on your wisdom mind, not on your ordinary, judgmental mind.”
The Buddha

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Jhanas are degrees of freedom from anxiety

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Many people live in a constant state of anxiety, wishing the world to change in some way, to fit personal expectations and desires. Rather than feeling gratitude for how things are, modern life encourages us to always seek something different or “better.”

Peace arises naturally when this “wanting mind” is released. Letting go of likes, dislikes and desires shifts our consciousness, transforming how we perceive the present moment.

Zen meditation, yoga, tai chi and other spiritual practices help us to calm the mind and experience ever deepening states of inner peace, mindfulness and balance.

These tranquil states of mind are called dhyāna or jhāna in Buddhism. They correspond to a shift in awareness, a release of goal-seeking, fears and judgements, along with a greater appreciation for life as it is…

~Christopher::
Tao & Zen

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Empty boats

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Sufi Story 💞

~
A monk decided to meditate alone, away from his monastery. He took his boat out to the middle of the lake, moored it there, closed his eyes and began meditating. After a few hours of undisturbed silence, he suddenly felt the bump of another boat colliding with his own.
With his eyes still closed, he felt his anger rising, and by the time he opened his eyes, he was ready to scream at the boatman who had so carelessly disturbed his meditation. But when he opened his eyes, he was surprised to find that it was an empty boat that had struck his own. It had probably gotten untethered and floated to the middle of the lake.
At that moment, the monk had a great realization. He understood that the anger was within him; it merely needed the bump of an external object to provoke…

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Jhanas are degrees of freedom from anxiety

Zen Flash

 Image may contain: text

Many people live in a constant state of anxiety, wishing the world to change in some way, to fit personal expectations and desires. Rather than feeling gratitude for how things are, modern life encourages us to always seek something different or “better.”

Peace arises naturally when this “wanting mind” is released. Letting go of likes, dislikes and desires shifts our consciousness, transforming how we perceive the present moment.

Zen meditation, yoga, tai chi and other spiritual practices help us to calm the mind and experience ever deepening states of inner peace, mindfulness and balance.

These tranquil states of mind are called dhyāna or jhāna in Buddhism. They correspond to a shift in awareness, a release of goal-seeking, fears and judgements, along with a greater appreciation for life as it is…

~Christopher::
Tao & Zen

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Developing inner values is much like physical exercise

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Developing inner values is much like physical exercise. The more we train our abilities, the stronger they become. The difference is that, unlike the body, when it comes to training the mind, there is no limit to how far we can go.

H.H.the Dalai Lama

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Jhanas are degrees of freedom from anxiety

Zen Flash

 Image may contain: text

Many people live in a constant state of anxiety, wishing the world to change in some way, to fit personal expectations and desires. Rather than feeling gratitude for how things are, modern life encourages us to always seek something different or “better.”

Peace arises naturally when this “wanting mind” is released. Letting go of likes, dislikes and desires shifts our consciousness, transforming how we perceive the present moment.

Zen meditation, yoga, tai chi and other spiritual practices help us to calm the mind and experience ever deepening states of inner peace, mindfulness and balance.

These tranquil states of mind are called dhyāna or jhāna in Buddhism. They correspond to a shift in awareness, a release of goal-seeking, fears and judgements, along with a greater appreciation for life as it is…

~Christopher::
Tao & Zen

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The important goal is to achieve peace of mind

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In a world where people easily fall under the sway of anger and hatred, we need love, patience, tolerance and contentment. You may have all the physical amenities you need to be comfortable, but if you have no peace of mind, they won’t make you happy. On the other hand if you have peace of mind, you’ll be happy whether you have those amenities or not. The important goal is to achieve peace of mind.

~H.H. Dalai Lama

Tao & Zen Community Forum.

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